There was an error in this gadget

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Raisins and Grapes Poisonous to Dogs

Why are grapes harmful?

As far as grapes and raisins go, no one is sure why they're harmful. It's been confirmed that even grapes grown without fertilizers or pesticides can be toxic to dogs but not to every dog, and not every time. It's also not known whether small amounts eaten over a long time period could have a cumulative effect.

What we do know is that the end result in nearly all reported cases of grape or raisin toxicity is acute kidney failure. (The term "acute" means that the condition is severe and comes on quickly.) The dog ultimately can't produce urine, which means they can't filter toxins out of their systems -- a process essential to life.

During the twelve-month period in which the effects of grapes were studied, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center handled 140 cases involving one or more dogs. Over a third of the dogs developed symptoms ranging from vomiting to kidney failure, and seven dogs died. The ASPCA based their study on reported cases, so naturally there may be cases where a dogs health is entirely unaffected by eating grapes. But until they know all the facts, the Society advises against feeding pets grapes or raisins in any amount.

How Many Would Poison Your Dog?

The minimum toxic dose is approximately 1 grape per pound of body weight.

15 lb dog = 12-14 grapes could be deadly
25 lb. dog = 23 grapes could be deadly
50 lb. dog = 50+ grapes could be deadly
75 lb. dog = 75 grapes could be deadly

Raisins, having lost their water content are considered more toxic at 6 raisins per kg of body weight, or 2-3 raisins per pound of body weight. Think how many raisins are in ONE small snack pack of raisins? Maybe enough to kill your dog.

15 lb. dog = 30-45 raisins could be deadly
25 lb. dog = 50-75 raisins could be deadly
50 lb. dog = 100-150 raisins could be deadly
75 lb. dog = 150-225 raisins could be deadly

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms appear 6-24 hours after the dog eats raisins or grapes (average is 12 hours). Initially, symptoms are gastro-intestinal signs, followed by kidney problems.
Vomiting is usually the primary sign, with diarrhea, depression/lethargy, anorexia, colic, dehydration and sharply decreased urine output. The course of the toxicosis is anywhere from 3 days to 3 weeks. Dogs with kidney problems have a guarded to poor prognosis.

The good news is that it is treatable, if you see any symptoms, take your dog to the vet clinic immediately!!!

Friday, November 12, 2010

Dog Ear Mites

Ear mites are a tiny spider like parasitic mite that infects the ears of dogs and cats. They usually live in the ear canals but can live on other parts of the dog or cat's body. Ear mites are the most common cause of ear infections seen by vets. They are more commonly found in cats than dogs but are a considerable cause of ear infection in dogs too. They cause pain and discomfort as they bite through a dog's skin to feed. This usually causes an allergic reaction in most dogs. Dog allergies can be as severe as in humans but with dog, symptoms show more because of the scratching that that may result in other dog health problems.

How are the mites transmitted?

Ear mites are extremely contagious. They can be passed from the mother animal to her offspring. Additionally, the mites are easily spread to other pets within the household including cats, dogs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils, mice, ferrets, etc. Humans are not affected.

Symptoms of Dog Ear Mites

Ear mites live inside the ear canal and they feed on earwax. As they stay for a longer time in the ears, their wastes are accumulated in the dog’s ears. It leads to irritation, swelling and accumulation of fluid inside the ear. When these mites bite the skin, it causes pain and discomfort. It gives rise to an allergic reaction in most dogs. There is an inflammatory reaction which swells up the area around dog’s ears. Some signs and symptoms of dog ear mites are frequent head shaking, rubbing the head and ears against objects, persistent scratching around the ears, loss of balance, increased earwax, vomiting, refusing to eat, sensitive ears and hurt when touched, foul-smelling odor coming from the ears and dark brown to black debris in the ears. Frequent scratching causes formation of sores around the ears.

A dog’s ear is generally dark, warm and moist. This environment is perfect for growth of yeast and bacteria. The open sores due to ear mite infestation can increase the risk of secondary bacterial or yeast infections, causing more pain. If left untreated, the ear mites can burst the eardrum. In such situation, the middle ear might be severely infected.

Diagnosing Ear Mites

Many pet owners mistake ear mite infestations for ear infections and embark on a lengthy treatment program using over-the-counter treatments to no avail.

It is therefore important to take your pet to the vet where a proper diagnosis can be made and yeast and bacterial infections can be ruled out. Other symptoms of ear mites include black or dark brown discharge from the ears (this may resemble ground coffee beans), sores or hair loss around the ear.

How Are Ear Mites Treated?

• Ear mites can be treated with products your veterinarian will prescribe that are applied directly in the ear or parasite medications that are applied right to the skin.

• If the ears have infections or build-up of debris, gentle cleaning may be required with cotton and a canine ear cleaner. (This may require sedation, depending on the dog's temperament and the severity of build-up.)

• Your veterinarian may also prescribe anti-inflammatory drugs or an antibiotic to resolve infections.

• A dog will start to feel relief soon after treatment begins, but please complete the full cycle of treatment and remember that all animals in a household need to be treated to ensure full eradication.

How Can I Prevent Ear Mites?

A routine ear cleaning once a month can inhibit the presence of ear mites. If your pet has recently recovered from ear mites, be sure to thoroughly clean his bedding and check your other pets for infection

Friday, October 29, 2010

How to Trim a Dog’s Nails

Nail trimming among dogs are very important because it brings comfort to your beloved pet. Nail trimming also reduce potential pet injuries and damage to your home. Ideally, your dog’s nails should be clipped at least once a month. They say that this is the hardest task the pet owner will do. For many pet owners, lax nail care results from fear of hurting their pet during trimming. Clipping your dog’s nails might be easier than you think, just keep these few easy tips in mind.

• First you need to have the proper equipment in trimming your dog’s nail. It is important to have a special nail clipper just for the dog. You can ask your vet an advice about what types of nail trimmers are best for your dog. Also make sure that the clippers are sharp.

• The mood also matters, it is better to start trimming your dog’s nail when your dog is in the mood. It’s very important that your dog associates the nail clipping with a pleasurable experience.

• After setting all things you can start the actual clipping. Start by asking for your dog’s paw a few times. Praise and treat her. Then take out the clippers and cut the tip of one nail at a 90 degree angle. When you start to see pale pink tissue near the top of the cut edge, stop. You can use a nail file to smooth the edges further. If the tip of the nail begins to bleed, apply pressure using styptic powder or a substitute such as baby powder or cotton. Avoid wiping the blood clot off the tip of the nail once the bleeding has stopped.

• If your dog gives positive reaction give him a treat and praise him a lot. If your dog gives negative reaction put away the clipper and start again when your dog calm down.

Thursday, July 15, 2010

How to Prepare Your Dog before Visiting a Dog Park?

If you are fortunate to live near the dog park and you have a dog, it is a best place for both of you to take healthy exercise and socialization. You can bring your dog at the dog park every weekend and let him play with other dogs. But before going to the park you should be prepared to make your visits safe and fun. First, know the rules of the park and follow guidance on how to use the park. Your dogs must be properly inoculated. He is license, wearing a dog collar with ID and rabies tags, and free of viral infections. Your dogs must be leashed until they are inside the fenced, off leash area.

You should recognize risks associated with interactions with other dogs and take protection to minimize these risks. The common risk is the spread of infectious disease. To avoid this kind of risk make sure all your dog vaccinations are up to date.

At Dog Park dog fight can’t be avoided and it happens sometime. To lessen this situation you need to train your dog well. Make sure your dog always comes when called and is well-behaved when interacting with other dogs, new people, and children.

When playing in the hot sun, your dog may not notice that it is getting overheated. Make sure your dog takes breaks in the shade, gets plenty of water, and does not play for long periods in the hot mid-day sun. Remember these tips when you go to a dog park for you to have a happy visit.

Friday, June 18, 2010

Canine Diabetes

Like humans, dogs can acquire diabetes too. Dogs with diabetes need utmost care and support because it is a life-threatening disease that every pet owner should be very concerned about.

Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The body's energy "fuel" is glucose; without insulin, cells are not able to use the glucose for its intended purpose, so glucose begins building up in the blood where it can be seen as hyperglycemia or high blood glucose levels. This most common form of diabetes (There is another form not covered here, Diabetes insipidus.) strikes 1 in 500 dogs. The condition is treatable, and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life. If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Diabetes mainly affects middle-aged and older dogs, but there have also been juvenile cases. The typical canine diabetes patient is middle-aged, female and overweight at diagnosis.

There are two types of diabetes, and dogs may acquire either of these types if they’re not cared for properly. The two types are diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is an endocrine disease that is brought about by the malfunction of the endocrine glands.

Diabetes insipidus is characterized by the lack of vasopressin. Vasopressin is an anti-diuretic hormone whose job is to control the kidney’s absorption of water.

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by insulin deficiency. It is a condition where the dog’s body can’t metabolize sugar well. This is the more common and more dangerous type of diabetes that dogs can possibly acquire.

Generally there's a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks, and it may escape notice for a while. The main symptoms are:

* excessive water consumption-- Polydipsia
* frequent and/or excessive urination-- Polyuria --possible house "accidents"
* greater than average appetite-- Polyphagia --with either weight loss or maintenance of current weight
* cloudy eyes-- Cataracts

Early diagnosis and interventive treatment can mean reduced incidence of complications such as cataracts and neuropathy. Since dogs are insulin-dependent, oral drugs are not effective for them,[9][15][16] and must instead be placed on insulin replacement therapy. Approved oral diabetes drugs can be helpful to sufferers of Type 2 diabetes because they work in one of three ways-by inducing the pancreas to produce more insulin, to allow the bodies to more effectively utilize the insulin it produces, or by slowing the glucose absorption rate from the GI tract. Unapproved and so-called "natural" remedies make similar claims for their products. All of this is based on the premise of having an endocrine pancreas which has beta cells capable of producing insulin. Those with type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, have beta cells which are permanently damaged, thus unable to produce insulin. This is the form diabetes takes in dogs-insulin-dependency-and the reason why nothing except using insulin by injections, insulin pump, or islet transplants can be considered real and effective treatment.

The most common form of this treatment is an intermediate-acting basal insulin (NPH/isophane, Caninsulin/Vetsulin), with a regimen of food and insulin every 12 hours, insulin following the meal. With Lantus (insulin glargine) being unreliable in dogs, it is rarely used to treat canine diabetes. Most dogs don't require basal/bolus insulin injections.

The management of dog diabetes starts with a proper diet. There are foods that your dog should eat in order to help this condition. On the other hand, there are certain foods that can possibly make your dog's diabetes become worse. When your dog is suffering from diabetes, regular visits to the vet are essential. You may also be required to start using prepared meals instead of giving your dog its regular food.

Friday, June 11, 2010

Which Foods Could be Dangerous for My Dog?

Some foods which are edible for humans, and even other species of animals, can pose hazards for dogs because of their different metabolism. Some may cause only mild digestive upsets, whereas, others can cause severe illness, and even death. The following common food items should not be fed (intentionally or unintentionally) to dogs. This list is, of course, incomplete because we can not possibly list everything your dog should not eat.


Items to avoid

Reasons to avoid

Alcoholic beverages

Can cause intoxication, coma, and death.

Baby food

Can contain onion powder, which can be toxic to dogs. (Please see onion below.) Can also result in nutritional deficiencies, if fed in large amounts.

Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources

Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system.

Cat food

Generally too high in protein and fats.

Chocolate, coffee, tea, and other caffeine

Contain caffeine, theobromine, or theophylline, which can be toxic and affect the heart and nervous systems.

Citrus oil extracts

Can cause vomiting.

Fat trimmings

Can cause pancreatitis.

Grapes and raisins

Contain an unknown toxin, which can damage the kidneys. There have been no problems associated with grape seed extract.

Hops

Unknown compound causes panting, increased heart rate, elevated temperature, seizures, and death.

Human vitamin supplements containing iron

Can damage the lining of the digestive system and be toxic to the other organs including the liver and kidneys.

Large amounts of liver

Can cause Vitamin A toxicity, which affects muscles and bones.

Macadamia nuts

Contain an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems and muscle.

Marijuana

Can depress the nervous system, cause vomiting, and changes in the heart rate.

Milk and other dairy products

Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Moldy or spoiled food, garbage

Can contain multiple toxins causing vomiting and diarrhea and can also affect other organs.

Mushrooms

Can contain toxins, which may affect multiple systems in the body, cause shock, and result in death.

Onions and garlic (raw, cooked, or powder)

Contain sulfoxides and disulfides, which can damage red blood cells and cause anemia. Cats are more susceptible than dogs. Garlic is less toxic than onions.

Persimmons

Seeds can cause intestinal obstruction and enteritis.

Pits from peaches and plums

Can cause obstruction of the digestive tract.

Potato, rhubarb, and tomato leaves; potato and tomato stems

Contain oxalates, which can affect the digestive, nervous, and urinary systems. This is more of a problem in livestock.

Raw eggs

Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

Raw fish

Can result in a thiamine (a B vitamin) deficiency leading to loss of appetite, seizures, and in severe cases, death. More common if raw fish is fed regularly.

Salt

If eaten in large quantities it may lead to electrolyte imbalances.

String

Can become trapped in the digestive system; called a "string foreign body."

Sugary foods

Can lead to obesity, dental problems, and possibly diabetes mellitus.

Table scraps (in large amounts)

Table scraps are not nutritionally balanced. They should never be more than 10% of the diet. Fat should be trimmed from meat; bones should not be fed.

Tobacco

Contains nicotine, which affects the digestive and nervous systems. Can result in rapid heart beat, collapse, coma, and death.

Yeast dough

Can expand and produce gas in the digestive system, causing pain and possible rupture of the stomach or intestines.

Xylitol (artificial sweetener)

Can cause liver failure.


Source: http://www.peteducation.com/



Tuesday, March 2, 2010

How to Stop Your Dog from Eating Poop

Dog poop eating is gross, but not necessarily detrimental to your dog’s health, and it can generally be stopped. Many dogs, particularly puppies, partake in a habit known as coprophagy – eating their own feces or the feces of other animals. Sometimes Coprophagia, can be an indication of more serious problems though, and you should have your pal checked out by a vet.


Most common reasons dogs eat their own waste are:

* Problem: lack of nutrients in his diet - Dogs that have parasites or worms do not digest food properly, because the parasites consume many of the nutrients. Dogs may try to re-digest the food to get all of the nutrients they can from it.
Solution: Have your dog tested for worms.

* Problem: Stress - When dogs are in high stress situations they may behave differently. These differences include eating, which includes eating their own waste.
Solution: Did you just adopt your dog? If so, give him some time to adjust! Exercise is also a great way to reduce stress.

Here are some tips on how to stop a dog from eating feces:

*The living or wandering area of the dog should be properly maintained. Pet owners should train the dog to defecate in a designated area. A dog might be forced to eat his feces in order to keep his surroundings clean.

*Consult a veterinarian specializing in animal behavior about this complex problem, called coprophagia. Although veterinarians and animal behaviorists are unsure what causes the disorder, it can often be controlled with behavioral modification or drug therapy when it's properly diagnosed.

*Dogs should be fed in a timely manner. Twice a day of equal servings is ideal. This practice is advisable to prevent a dog from eating feces because of hunger.

*Buy a food additive - such as Deter or Forbid - or dry kibble that makes feces unappetizing to dogs, and add it to your dog's food if he's into eating his own. These products contain a chemical, monosodium glutamate, which is made bitter tasting during the digestive process.

*Teach basic obedience training. Say "off" if the dog is starting to taste his poop.

*Take your dog out on a leash. Jerk the leash when he heads toward feces, and reward him when he doesn't approach it. Use this method until your dog learns not to approach feces.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010

How to Prepare Your Dog before Visiting a Dog Park?

If you are fortunate to live near the dog park and you have a dog, it is a best place for both of you to take healthy exercise and socialization. You can bring your dog at the dog park every weekend and let him play with other dogs. But before going to the park you should be prepared to make your visits safe and fun. First, know the rules of the park and follow guidance on how to use the park. Your dogs must be properly inoculated. He is license, wearing a dog collar with ID and rabies tags, and free of viral infections. Your dogs must be leashed until they are inside the fenced, off leash area.

You should recognize risks associated with interactions with other dogs and take protection to minimize these risks. The common risk is the spread of infectious disease. To avoid this kind of risk make sure all your dog vaccinations are up to date.

At Dog Park dog fight can’t be avoided and it happens sometime. To lessen this situation you need to train your dog well. Make sure your dog always comes when called and is well-behaved when interacting with other dogs, new people, and children.

When playing in the hot sun, your dog may not notice that it is getting overheated. Make sure your dog takes breaks in the shade, gets plenty of water, and does not play for long periods in the hot mid-day sun. Remember these tips when you go to a dog park for you to have a happy visit.

**This article also published in Laila Smith ArticlesBase Account here: Laila Smith - Authors Articles - ArticlesBase.com

Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Antifreeze Poisoning In Dogs and Cats

Antifreeze poisoning is one of the most common forms of poisoning in small animals, and this is because it is so commonly found in households. Antifreeze poisoning typically happens when antifreeze drips from a car’s radiator, where it is licked off the ground and ingested by a pet. Your dog may also come into contact with antifreeze that has been added to a toilet bowl. This occurs in homes where the residents will use antifreeze during the cold months to "winterize" their pipes. Even if you do not take this action in your own home, it is something to be aware of when visiting other homes, or when vacationing at a winter residence.

Antifreeze products usually contain one of three active ingredients:

* Ethylene glycol
* Propylene glycol
* Methanol

Signs of Antifreeze Poisoning:

Stage One

*Staggering
*Vomiting
*Confusion/disorientation
*Listlessness
*Excessive drinking and urination

The first stage of antifreeze poisoning starts approximately thirty minutes after ingestion. Your dog will be appearing to be drunk, he may vomit, stagger and suffer from confusion and disorientation. This stage of the poisoning may last for several hours.

Stage Two

* Diarrhea
* Convulsions
* Unconsciousness

Stage two will commence after your dog will have gone through what appears to be a recovery period. He'll seem to be getting better, but shortly (possibly a day or longer) afterwards, the toxins will permanently damage his liver and kidneys as these organs try to metabolize the poison.

Diagnosis:

Dogs and cats can only be cured when the poisoning is detected before extensive kidney damage has occurred. Diagnosis is not difficult when an owner presents a pet that is staggering and drunken in appearance and has seen the animal drink the poison. It is much more difficult when the ethylene glycol first reaches the liver because early in this stage the pet will appear healthy while later in this stage symptoms are multisystem and nonspecific. We often confuse these signs with other diseases such as pancreatitis, acute gastroenteritis, diabetes or other forms of kidney disease. By the time ethylene glycol metabolites have attacked the kidneys it is too late for a cure. By this time the animal is very sick from uremia and acidic blood (acidosis). In unfortunate animals that die, it is the six-sided or Maltese-cross shaped crystals of calcium oxalate within kidney tubules that allow pathologists to make the diagnosis. Sometimes the urine of affected pets will glow when exposed to a woods or ultraviolet lamp.

Emergency First Aid

Immediate veterinary assistance is the only thing that will save your dog. Inducing vomiting and giving your dog activated charcoal will not cure your dog, but it will lessen the poison that is in his system. Save any of vomited material, and bring it with you to the vet's.

Prevention

Antifreeze poisoning can be easily avoided by following a few simple precautions:

1. Keep antifreeze containers tightly closed and stored out of the reach of pets.

2. Take care not to spill antifreeze, and if it is spilled, ensure that it is immediately and thoroughly cleaned up.

3. Dispose of used antifreeze containers properly.

4. Check the radiator of your car regularly, and repair leaks immediately.

5. Do not allow your dog to wander unattended where there is access to antifreeze (e.g., roads, gutters, garages, and driveways).

6. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has labeled propylene glycol safe and it is now used for antifreeze. Look for antifreeze with this ingredient instead, to keep your pet safer from accidental poisoning.

Sunday, January 3, 2010

Safety Traveling Tips for Dogs

Riding is the second nature of dogs and that is what they like to do most. To see them enjoy riding with us is the best moment we can treasure and ensuring their safety is very important. We need to be aware in some safety tips while traveling with pets. When we are on the road we always fastened our seat belt, so as our pet for their protections. Dog car seat is a very popular item for small pets to travel comfortably and if your pet can't fit in a dog car seat restrain the pet within a crate, or use a very well padded crate.

When traveling with your pet never allow your dog’s head out the car window because this can cause eye irritations and other ailments. Also it has a possibility that your dog will jump at the window and can be hit. Don’t leave your dog in the car during the summer months even with the windows down because cars can heat up very quickly causing heatstroke, brain damage or even death. It is also better if you could bring your dogs favorite toys and comforter while traveling to provide familiarity in unfamiliar surroundings.